The Civil War Hub of ArkansasOn September 27, 1862 Major-General Samuel R. Curtis wrote from St. Louis to General-in-Chief Major-General H.W. Halleck telling him that he had intelligence reports coming into his headquarters noting Confederate movements into the State of Missouri from the southeast and the southwest corners. “Have moved from Helena to make diversion, but that force is so far away it cannot avail much.” He continued, “Picket were fired on near Greenville, Wayne County, last night; 1 of our men killed and 2 wounded.” After coordinating movements of troops and ideas on how to defend against the Confederates inching their way northward, Curtis states, “The storm sets this way just now.”

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Also on September 27, 1862, Major-General Samuel R. Curtis wrote to Brigadier-General Fredrick Steele telling him that, “Since I made the order and sent out dispatches, which will go by the steamer War Eagle, I have seen your dispatch to Schofield, saying you would move on Little Rock.” He told Steele, “If you have moved beyond 20 miles when this reaches you, go ahead at least to White River [and] If what is stated here be true there is little or no force left at Little Rock, and if such be your information, when you get to Devall’s Bluff send forward a cavalry or light force to take that place, destroy military stores, and bring away archives, if any such things are left by the rebels, and immediately fall back to the Mississippi, to carry out the orders I have sent or such others as I may send.” But Curtis then tells Steele, “If you have not advanced 20 miles, let a cavalry force dash on some distance to cover your return, to carry out my Special Orders, Numbers 2.”
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Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas

Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas

On September 27, 1864 Powell Clayton in Pine Bluff wrote to Captain C.H. Dyer, General Carr’s Adjutant, telling him that the scouting expedition that was sent out in the direction of Monticello returned in this date and the commanding officer of that scout, Lieutenant Grove, reported that, “the disposition of the rebel army [is] about the same as before, except that they have established an out-post of 75 men on this side of Branchville and a continuous line of pickets from there to Mount Elba.” The report noted that Lieutenant Gove, “dashed upon one of these posts” and ended up capturing one prisoner and seven horses, “with equipment.”
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Military actions in this “Today in Arkansas During the Civil War” column can be traced better using the Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas. You can trace the same roads they walked in many cases in this atlas. You can find obscure references to communities mentioned in Civil War records that can be located in this atlas. Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas is the perfect companion book for this “Today in History” series.

If you know of any other military actions or other things that happened that we did not post on a certain day, send us an email to info@arkansastoothpick.com.