The Civil War Hub of ArkansasOn September 12, 1862, Colonel William Weer begn a dispatch to Captain Moonlight at Fort Scott, Kansas that gave some military intelligence on the Confederate forces in Arkansas. He wrote that General Thomas C. Hindman was in command of the rebels and that he was being replaced in Little Rock by T.H. Holmes. He continued, “Rains is in command of Missouri troops, about 7,000 [and] The balance of Hindman’s force is composed of Texans and Arkansas troops and Cooper’s Indians, number not known…They have been located about Maysville, Ark., while Rains is at Indian Creek, about 10 miles southeast of Neosho.”

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On September 12, 1864 Colonel Abraham H. Ryan of the 3rd Arkansas Cavalry (US) wrote up his report after having completed his scouting mission from Lewisburg to Norristown and Russelville. During his scout he skirmished with Confederate forces. His report noted that he left out on his mission on the morning of September 9 and travelled to Norristown and Russelville, “charging into both places, killing 2 rebels near Russellville.” His report includes intelligence that had General Sterling Price’s command at 15,000 men with eighteen cannons, “all the men mounted, with the exception of 200, who act as train guards.”

He reported that Sterling Price left Dover Saturday morning in the direction of Burrowsville, “for the avowed purpose of going to Missouri.” Ryan noted that Captain Clean left out on the scouting mission with thirty-eight men and returned with only fifteen, “The remainder are in the brush and will remain till relieved.” Regarding the worn down horses used on the mission, he noted that they, “gave out before reaching the Cadron… Hiding their horse equipments, the party came through on foot, swimming the Cadron eight miles above the ferry- crossing.” From there the report continued, “Captain Clear and five of his men came down on the Chippewa from the Palarm, the other ten coming through by land.”

Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas

Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas

In conclusion, Ryan included information regarding Gordon’s regiment, noting that they, “left there Saturday a. m., stating that they were to join Shelby, who was to cut the communications of and starve the forces out of Little Rock.”
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Military actions in this “Today in Arkansas During the Civil War” column can be traced better using the Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas. You can trace the same roads they walked in many cases in this atlas. You can find obscure references to communities mentioned in Civil War records that can be located in this atlas. Civil War Arkansas: A Military Atlas is the perfect companion book for this “Today in History” series.

If you know of any other military actions or other things that happened that we did not post on a certain day, send us an email to info@arkansastoothpick.com.