Arkansas in the Civil War: A Military Atlas out June 10, 2016! Just in time for Father’s Day!
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Arkansas in the Civil War: A Military Atlas

Arkansas in the Civil War: A Military Atlas

Many types of landmarks dotted the cultural landscape in south Arkansas, including churches/cemeteries and home sites, which were heavily populated on the original 1864 map. A total of 133 churches/cemeteries are shown on the map and are respectively represented in this atlas. The first, second, and third most common names of these churches/cemeteries include a four-way tie for third, each numbering three: Ebenezer, Macedonia, Shady Grove, and Union. The second most common name for churches/cemeteries are Antioch and Bethel, numbering four, while the most common name shown on the original map, totaling five, is Mt. Zion.

Aside from churches/cemeteries, Confederate engineers managed to document well over 1,300 locations of home sites. The names are small on the original 1864 map and sometimes difficult to read, but given the tools these men possessed, they left us a masterpiece of historical art and valuable information that serves paramount to Arkansas Civil War and genealogical research in a new medium never before available.Most home sites are labeled with only a last name, while fewer have first and/or middle initials. Female heads-of-household are labeled with a “Mrs” (156 in all) in front of the name and most widows are represented with a “Wow” (8 in all) abbreviation in front of theirs. Roughly twelve per cent of the heads-of-households depicted in this map are female. One grid, specifically K3, located between modern-day Hope and Texarkana, depicts this historical and cultural phenomenon.

Represented by an area of the map of approximately 400 square miles, there are a relatively large number of single female households. Out of 59 total households, twelve are labeled missus (green dots) and two widows (purple dots). Put in perspective, that is equivalent to one female head-of-household every thirty square miles. Moreover, one in five households are without an adult male, according to the map.