This atlas will be available on Amazon.com and Arkansas Toothpick on June 10, 2016!

Arkansas in the Civil War: A Military Atlas

Arkansas in the Civil War: A Military Atlas

A close examination of the map revealed home sites, churches, towns, rivers, prairies, mountains, and so much more. The engineer’s map also revealed sites including cotton mills, businesses, post offices, and even the locations of ninety-eight Confederate encampments. Unfortunately only parts of the southern half of the state was reconnoitered, leaving the north half much less detailed but not entirely bereft of geographical information crucial in understanding Civil War military actions in north Arkansas as in the southern part of the state, where the map is littered with literally hundreds of landmarks scattered from Texarkana on the Texas border in the west to Helena on the eastern border with Mississippi.

The digital reconstruction of the original 1864 map was done in a series of phases, beginning with the graphic creation of each township respective to its known geographic location. In essence, cities and towns, home sites, businesses, forts, and encampments were represented by known geographic points and the resulting digitization of the respective image files of each township had to be properly overlaid over the entire state of Arkansas. Points on the map, like township corners, had to be matched up and anchored to their coinciding known locations. This process is called georectification. To reduce the amount of warping, each section of the state had to be broken into townships, consisting of 1,465 pieces of a larger puzzle of 1864 Arkansas. The georectification and digitization processes took several months to complete. An editorial decision was made to only include certain rivers to avoid a complex exhaustive hydrology that would distract from the historic value of the military nature of this atlas. In short, know there were more streams in Arkansas but only rivers that were named in the original map and rivers that intersected road crossings were digitized and added to the atlas.