Civil War Hub of Arkansas

Civil War Hub of Arkansas

2016 is already getting busy! The Arkansas Toothpick can report progress on the battle field preservation front, an increase in volunteers throughout the state at various battle sites, and a tremendous number of readers taking an interest in the Civil War in Arkansas in general. Overall, the progress throughout the state has been great over the past year and things are only looking up.

With the increase in interest, likewise an increase in new information being found. Even after one hundred and fifty-five years we would know all there is to know about the topic. Not so at all. In fact, new evidence shows very interesting sets of circumstances at work that drove Arkansas to leave the union. So as not to steal my own thunder, keep an eye on the 155 Years Ago column right here on the Arkansas Toothpick. It is all based on my latest book “Arkansas in the Civil War: 1860”.

Over the next week the Toothpick will be promoting a very rare opportunity for Civil War buffs in Arkansas and the Mississippi Delta region. There will be a full living history next weekend (January 23, 2016) in Helena, Arkansas. Civil War living historians (soldiers) will host an engineer workshop and build, in front of visitors, battlefield obstacles including the ever-popular Cheaveax D’ Fris. You will be able to watch how they were built 150 years ago and visitors will be able to see other camp life and activity throughout the weekend. If you are interested in becoming a Civil War reenactor/living historian, email info@arkansastoothpick.com.The living history will take place around Fort Curtis in downtown Helena, Arkansas.

Arkansas in the Civil War: 1861 contains over 200 pages of primary source documents that, for the first time ever, tell the whole story of the Civil War in Arkansas from both sides using their own words. Some documents are in print for the very first time, including letters, official correspondence, historical accounts of battles, newspaper editorials, and much more. It took over a decade to compile the documents that help tell the story of Arkansas the first year of the Civil War.