31Jul/15

AUGUST ARKANSAS CIVIL WAR 150 EVENTS ANNOUNCED

Arkansas Civil WarLITTLE ROCK—Battlefield tours, artillery demonstrations, lectures and exhibits are among the August 2015 activities the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission has sanctioned, ACWSC Chairman Tom Dupree announced today. A complete listing of scheduled sesquicentennial activities, as well as additional information on the activities listed below, can be found at http://www.arkansascivilwar150.com/events/.

Civil War sesquicentennial events during August include:

* Tour of Elkins’ Ferry Battlefield, featuring a bus tour of the 1864 battle site, dinner and a talk on preservation efforts at the Reed’s Bridge Battlefield in Jacksonville, will be held August 1 in Prescott; call (870) 887-2101 or email tclupper@pn.partnership.org for more information.

* Artillery Demonstration will be held at Pea Ridge National Battlefield in Benton County on August 1, 15 and 29; call (479) 451-8122 for more information.

* Empty Cupboards and Scarce Game, an event focusing on the hardships faced during the Civil War, will be held August 8 at Jacksonport State Park; call (870) 523-2143 or email jacksonport@arkansas.com for more information.

* Life as a Confederate Soldier, a program on the daily life of the common soldier in the Civil War, will be held August 8 at Mammoth Spring State Park; call (870) 625-7364 or email mammothspring@arkansas.com for more information.

* “Civil War Arkansas 1861-1865,” the ACWSC traveling exhibit, will be at the Cross County Library in Wynne through August 9; call (870) 238-3850 or email jpaul@crosscountylibrary.org for more information.

* Grand Prairie Civil War Round Table will feature Dr. Bill Gurley speaking on “Yankee Bullets, Rebel Blood: The Remarkable Medical Casebook of Dr. Henry M. Dye, Confederate Surgeon in Arkansas” at the Lonoke County Museum in Lonoke on August 11; call (501) 676-6750 or email misslata@sbcglobal.net for additional information

* “Fought in Earnest,” the Arkansas History Commission’s traveling exhibit, will be at Lake Dardanelle State Park in Russellville August 11 to 25; call (479) 967-5516 or email lakedardanelle@arkansas.com for more information.

* Civil War Collections, a display and discussion of Civil War artifacts, will be held at Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park on August 16; call (479) 846-2990 or email prairiegrove@arkansas.com for more information.

* “Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War,” an exhibit on the effects of the Civil War on injured soldiers during and after the war, will be at Pea Ridge National Battlefield in Benton County through August 15; call (479) 451-8122 for more information.

* Civil War Roundtable of the Delta will feature Jack Myers of the Delta Cultural Center speaking “The Bitter End: A Look at the Conclusion of the Civil War in Arkansas” when it meets at Beth El Heritage Hall in Helena-West Helena on August 17; email armedic73@hotmail.com for more information.

* Tour of Moscow Church and Archeological Richness of Civil War Sites, featuring bus tours of an 1864 battle site and other local historic sites before dinner, will be held August 22 in Prescott; call (870) 887-2101 or email tclupper@pn.partnership.org for more information.

* Civil War Round Table of Arkansas will feature Mark Christ of the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial speaking on the experiences of a soldier from Wisconsin when it meets at Second Presbyterian Church in Little Rock on August 25; email brianb1578@aol.com for more information.

* “Batesville in the Civil War,” an exhibit on life in Batesville during the Civil War, will continue at the Old Independence Regional Museum in Batesville during August; call (870) 793-2121 for more information.

* Des Arc Rangers: Co. B, 1st Arkansas Mounted Rifles, an exhibit on a Confederate unit raised in the area, will continue at Lower White River Museum State Park at Des Arc during August; call (870) 256-3711 or email lowerwhiterivermuseum@arkansas.com for more information.

* “‘Freedom! Oh, Freedom’: Arkansas’s People of African Descent and the Civil War, 1861-1866” will continue at the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center in Little Rock during August; call (501) 683-3593 or email info@mosaictemplarscenter.com for more information.

* War on the Water: Gunboats on the White River, an exhibit at Lower White River Museum State Park in Des Arc, will continue during August; call (870) 256-3711 or email lowerwhiterivermuseum@arkansas.com for more information.
For more information on sesquicentennial plans, visit http://www.arkansascivilwar150.com/or e-mail acwsc@arkansasheritage.org.

The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission is housed within the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.

27Jul/15

Unique Volunteer Opportunities

Living History opportunities in Helena, AR

Living History opportunities in Helena, AR

Living History opportunities in Helena, AR[/caption]If you are interested in starting a living history program and are at least 14 years of age and older, then Helena is the place for you. We are looking for volunteer living historians interested in helping to share our unique story with visitors from across the globe. We are looking for tour guides, Union artillery, Union infantry, Confederate infantry, and civilians. If this sounds like something you might be interested in starting, contact us at info@arkansastoothpick.com.

26Jul/15

Cameras on Confederate Monuments- The need is Real

Arkansas ToothpickAgain, I want to take this time to thank everyone who donated to the safety and security of Confederate monuments in Helena, Arkansas. As many of you know this is the final resting place of over 120 Confederate veterans, including three generals (Pat Cleburne, James C. Tappan, and Thomas C. Hindman).

Your donations have helped us secure several cameras of which are either up or being shipped. We have been studying the photos from the cameras and everything is safe at this time. The cameras are trained in on license plate numbers and the general view of the cemetery. This is one way to keep out monuments safe.

We have a great system down for this and if any Sons of Confederate Veterans camps or individuals concerned about the safety of their cemetery, please email us and we will tell you how we are doing it here and what equipment we are using. Because of the sensitivity of the situation, we will not post images for public consumption until, heaven forbid, there are criminals caught in the act of vandalizing the cemetery.

There are other camps in Arkansas following suite and I recommend every Confederate monument in this country get a camera immediately!

Again, thank you so much for your donations! Our readers have stepped up to the plate and put their money where their mouth is and we do appreciate it. We will install two more cameras as funds come in. Have a great week everyone!

23Jul/15

Three different tours of Civil War sites in the Nevada County

Arkansas ToothpickThe Nevada County Depot Museum in Prescott, Arkansas announces three different tours of Civil War sites in the Nevada County area to bring awareness to the preservation of Civil War Battlefields in the area. The sites were part of the Red River Campaign of 1864 and include: Elkins Ferry, Prairie D’Ane, and Moscow Church.

On Saturday, August 1, a tour will be provided of the Elkins Ferry battlefield that took place on April 2-3, 1864 on the Little Missouri River. The tour guide for the event will be Arkansas Historic Preservation Outreach Coordinator, Mark Christ. Civil War preservationists regard it as a pristine battlefield site. Following the tour will be an evening meal at the Prescott First Methodist Church followed by a presentation from Tommy Dupree of Reeds Bridge Battlefield in Jacksonville, Arkansas. He will show how the initial preservation of a Civil War site in the greater Little Rock area has turned into an economic stimulus for the local region.

Other upcoming tours include:

August 22, 2015: Tour of Moscow Church and Archeological Richness of Civil War sites. Attendees will meet at the Prescott First United Methodist Church on 125 West Second Street North in Prescott, Arkansas at 5:30 p.m. Admission for the tours is $20 per person and includes an evening meal. To register for the event call the Nevada County Chamber of Commerce at 870-887-2101 or email tclupper@pnpartnership.org. Seating is limited. Dress is casual.

All tours are to bring awareness of the Save Elkins Ferry project. The Depot Museum is currently seeking donations to help purchase a portion of the Civil War battlefield. To find out more and donate go to www.saveelkinsferry.com.

This tour has been financed entirely with tax funds from the state of Arkansas and the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission in association with the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, an agency of the Department of Arkansas Heritage.

21Jul/15

A Humbled Thank You To Our Readers

Arkansas ToothpickI am truly humbled by the support our readers have given over the past 24 hours! One surveillance camera is in place right now and more are expected to go up as donations continue to come in. We will post soon how many visitors each monument/park has had each month and report any vandalism immediately. Because of your support, Confederate monuments in Helena, Arkansas will remain safe and secure.

Our Battlefield Crew section of the Seven Generals Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp #135 works daily to ensure the maintenance and security of our sites; it is a job we take very serious. With your continued support, these monuments, markers, parks, and heritage sites will be around for your grandchildren to enjoy!

Next time you are in Helena, contact our Battlefield Crew for a behind the scenes tour of Civil War Helena!

Please pause for a moment and send us a dollar via pay-pal at the bottom of this post or simply put a dollar bill or check in the mail to:

Seven Generals SCV Camp #135
ATTN:Heritage Defense
PO Box 409
Helena, AR 72342

These brave soldiers fought and died for their cause. Our cause is to make sure we never forget them. Please support our heritage today! Every dollar counts!





20Jul/15

The Arkansas Toothpick Needs Your Help More Than Ever

Arkansas ToothpickThe Arkansas Toothpick is leading the charge in Arkansas in protecting Southern Heritage from monsters that are hellbent in destroying everything from the Confederate Flag to monuments across the South. As editor of the Arkansas Toothpick, I encourage our readers from near and far to make at least a ONE DOLLAR donation.

Every cent will be used to maintain video cameras now hidden throughout the community to keep a watchful eye on our precious monuments, flags, and graves. The Helena Battlefield Crew (Seven Generals SCV Camp #135) takes the heritage of the men buried here very serious and we need your help.

For over ten years we have been writing and posting educational material for all to use for free. We have kept you updated throughout the 150th commemoration of the war. We have spent hundreds of hours updating and maintaining the Civil War Hub of Arkansas; we need your support now more than ever.

The fight is real. Some will not stop until every monument and flag has been destroyed. We can stop it here and now with more supplies and equipment. We will assure our readers that the first infraction caught in camera will be publicized and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Please pause for a moment and send us a dollar via pay-pal at the bottom of this post or simply put a dollar bill or check in the mail to:

Seven Generals SCV Camp #135
ATTN:Heritage Defense
PO Box 409
Helena, AR 72342

These brave soldiers fought and died for their cause. Our cause is to make sure we never forget them. Please support our heritage today! Every dollar counts!





19Jul/15

Call for info on Arkansas soldiers

Arkansas ToothpickWe are always gathering new information on soldiers that called Arkansas home during the Civil War. We love to share personal diary accounts and journals of both Union and Confederate troops that served in the state. If you have any info on a soldier you would like to highlight on the Arkansas Toothpick, email us the info- include a photo of the soldier if you can. Now that the 150th is over, this would be a great way to remember those that served their respective states during the Civil War in Arkansas.

19Jul/15

ARKANSAS CIVIL WAR SESQUICENTENNIAL COMMISSION AWARDS FINAL GRANTS

Arkansas ToothpickLITTLE ROCK—The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission has awarded $7,338 in grants for five projects to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the American Civil War, ACWSC Chairman Tom Dupree announced today.

Recipients of Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Grants were:

* Encyclopedia of Arkansas History and Culture/Central Arkansas Library System, Little Rock, $2,000 for Civil War Arkansas entries in the online encyclopedia

* Ouachita County Historical Society, Camden, $1,701 for equipment for the First Kansas Colored Infantry re-enactor group

* Pioneer Washington Restoration Foundation, Washington, $1,875 for the 9th annual Red River Heritage Symposium, “The World Turned Upside Down”

* Nevada County Depot and Museum, Prescott, $1,012 for a tour program of Camden Expedition sites in Nevada County

* Albert Glenn Glover, El Dorado, $750 for Seminar, AR: The Under-Told Story project focusing on the Civil War-era history of a Union County town.

These were the final grants to be awarded through the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission’s grants program. For more information on sesquicentennial plans, visit www.arkansascivilwar150.com or e-mail acwsc@arkansasheritage.org.

The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission is housed within the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.

18Jul/15

Our Ancestors Fought For Their State- We Must Remember Them

Arkansas ToothpickOn this fine summer morning in Dixie, it came to me that the crux of the problems we face today as descendants of Confederate soldiers stems from a condition in 1861 and 1862 where men were both volunteering for duty and some were conscripted.

Let me elaborate on the latter of the two. For many years we have held on high those volunteers that signed up for military duty as the Civil War began. These men were not volunteering so much for the country of the Confederate States, but rather for their own respective home states. Take Arkansas for example.

Let us assume you ancestor did not volunteer at the outset of the war. Let us assume your ancestor was not in favor of secession, that he was a strong Union man. In 1862 when Arkansas was left bereft of any standing army following the Battle of Shiloh (April 1862), General T.C. Hindman rose to the challenge to create an army for Arkansas out of thin air.

No it was not magic, but rather the harsh and unbending situation that provided the environment for conscription, the likes of which the state has not seen before or since. Hindman was unmoving in his draft of men in Arkansas. If you were of a certain age, you were left no choice: join the army or be shot on sight. This was the harsh reality across the South, not just Arkansas. If your ancestor was in the South and was a certain age, he fought whether he wanted to or not, whether YOU would have wanted him to or not.

Remember that the next time you see that flag flying. Remember that the next time someone tells you the flag is offensive. The only thing offensive is ignorance; the harsh truth is that these men fought for Arkansas and we must never forget the sacrifices they made, both willingly and unwillingly.

To help protect these mens’ monuments and graves in Helena, Arkansas, please send a ONE DOLLAR donation to see to it that these men will never be forgotten.





17Jul/15

Black Confederate Speaks in Favor of Confederate Monument

3rd Arkansas Battle Flag

3rd Arkansas Battle Flag

CLARION LEDGER Jackson, Mississippi – February 27, 1890
THE MONUMENT.
GRAPHIC DESCRIPTION OF THE PASSAGE OF BILL IN THE HOUSE.

Rev. Wm. Hayne Leavell, of Meridian, was present in the House of Representatives when the bill was under discussion to appropriate $10,000 to the Confederate Monument; and writes of the occasion as follows to the Southwestern Presbyterian:

On the morning of Tuesday, the 11th of February, I attended the session of the House of Representatives of the State of Mississippi. The House had under consideration a Senate bill to appropriate $10,000 to complete the Confederate Monument, the base of which was laid in May, 1888, in the State House Park, with very imposing ceremonies.

Certain ladies who had been the original and guiding spirits that had inaugurated and persistently presented the monument, were duly admitted with their friends to the privileges of the floor to the House, on the occasion that was to decide their success or failure.

A young legislator, who sat at my side, whispered. “This is an occasion for eloquence,” and so it seemed to me.
The first speaker gave a rather elaborate bit of ornamented sentiment in favor of the bill, but it did not seem to catch the heart of the House, and it remained apparently listless and unsympathetic. Then arose a young man from one of the northern counties, who smiled gentilly and broadly as if moved by both consciousness and anticipation, and, with many uttered regrets and protestations of patriotism, fired broadside into the bill. His county was poor, there were many Confederate soldiers living maimed; and poor there were many widows and orphans of dead soldiers in very narrow straits, and besides all which, the soldiers whom it was proposed to honor, were all dead and did not desire a monument; he should vote against the bill!

This speech was the first sign of definite interest the House manifested. Many successive speakers rose to annul the young man with the genial smile, and reminded him that he was young, that his future was all before him, that any objection to this bill offered by the people now, was a mere passing sentiment, and that he should remember that he was the son of a soldier, that the monument was to be erected in honor of his father among the faithful men, and that he ought to be ashamed of himself. But there was nothing like eloquence in the air. Everything seemed dull and dead.

On my right rose a negro man of some 60 years of age, one of the few Republican members in the pretty solidly Democratic House, and said in full round tones, “Mr. Speaker.” The Speaker recognized him with, “The gentleman from Washington,” that being the county he represented. Immediately a perfect stillness filled the place, and the House was all attention. A smile of anticipated pleasure lighted every face, and hardly knowing why, I fell into the prevailing mood.

The colored Republican member, speaking on this bill to appropriate monies to erect a monument in honor of the Confederate dead, said something like this:

“Mr. Speaker, I have arisen here in my place to offer a few words on the bill. I have come from a sick bed. Perhaps it was not prudent for me to come, but Sir I could not rest quietly in my room without contributing a few remarks of my own. I was sorry to hear the speech of the young gentlemen from Marshall County. I am sorry that any son of a soldier should go on record as opposed to the erection of a monument in honor of their brave dead. And Sir, I am convinced that had he seen what I saw at Seven Pines and in the seven days fighting around Richmond, the battle field covered with the mangled forms of those who fought for their country and for their countries honor, he would not have made that speech. When the news came that the South had been invaded, those men went forth to fight for what they believed. And they made no requests for monuments. But they died and their virtues should be remembered. Sir, I went with them. I too wore the Grey. The same color my master wore. We stayed four long years and if that war had gone on until now, I would have been there yet. I want to honor those brave men who died for their convictions. When my mother died I was a boy. Who Sir, then acted the part of a mother to the orphaned slave boy but my “old misses.” Was she living now or could speak to me from those high realms where gathered the sainted dead, she would tell me to vote for this bill and, Sir, I shall vote for it. I want it known to all the world that my vote is given in favor of a bill to erect a monument in honor of the Confederate dead.”

The House burst into rapturous and prolonged applause. The bill was put upon its passage and was carried by a good majority. Every colored member voted “aye.”
The name of the negro who, though emancipated by the Confederate failure, and Republican in politics, voted for the bill, is J.F. Harris, of Washington count, Miss.