05Jul/15

From the Editor: Arkansas Toothpick Revised

A lot has happened since the last update on the Arkansas Toothpick. Over a month ago the website was hacked by a muslim in Turkey. It was such a thorough hack job that it was intended to just let the Toothpick go by the wayside. After all it is the end of the 150th commemoration of the Civil War. What better time to let the 10 year old website die.

Then all hell broke loose in South Carolina. The liberal media jumped on the Confederate flag and has yet to let up. Two days later the Arkansas Toothpick was severely attacked by yet another muslim in Turkey. The website became a propaganda page for muslim extremists. This I would not tolerate and I quickly got in touch with Robert Eaton, the Toothpick’s ONLY trusted tech support. Rob was able to get the website back under control and salvage the thousands of archived pages. His work will never be forgotten and I owe him gratitude!

After taking back control of the website, we noticed that the hacker may very well have come from an Arkansas Confederate cemetery page. Ladies and gentlemen, everything Confederate is under attack and the Toothpick is here to stay despite the bastards. The original Toothpick template was hacked to pieces and was not recoverable. This ended up being a good thing for us and our readers, as the template installed now is more user friendly both on a computer as well as on a mobile device. We hope you enjoy your new experience on the NEW Arkansas Toothpick. Drop us an e-mail and let us know what you think- both good and bad.

With everything Confederate under attack, we want the Toothpick to be as functional as possible. Email your comments to: info@arkansastoothpick.com.


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15May/15

Civil War Roundtable of the Delta Monday Night in Helena

Arkansas In The Civil WarThe next Civil War Roundtable of the Delta will be held 6 p.m., Monday, May 18 at Beth El Heritage Hall.
Mark Christ, Community Outreach Director for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program and John House, archeologist with the Arkansas Archeological Survey, will discuss the 2004 discovery of Confederate graves.
Clear-cutting in the vicinity of Battery D in Helena in 2004 disturbed a mass grave of Confederate soldiers in the area through which Brig. Gen. James Fagan’s Arkansas division attacked Union forces at the battery. The remains that were recovered were reburied in the Confederate Cemetery in Helena.


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12May/15

Professional Development for Teachers

Arkansas In The Civil WarThe Department of Arkansas Heritage will be presenting professional development workshops across Arkansas this summer for Arkansas History teachers of all grade levels.

The schedule is:

June 15th: DeQueen-Mena Co-op
June 18th: ArchFord Co-op
June 24-25th: Southeast Co-op
July 6: O.U.R. Co-op
July 15-16: Wilbur D. Mills Co-op
July 22: Department of Arkansas Heritage
July 29-30: Northwest Co-op
July 31: University of Central Arkansas

You can read about the full array of topics at http://www.arkansasheritage.com/Learn/workshop-descriptions.

Topics include “Arkansas Geography,” “The Trail of Tears in Arkansas,” “Civil Rights in Arkansas,” “Natural Heritage of the Civil War in Arkansas,” “Artist Residency Grants,” “Arkansas Borders: How We Got In This Shape,” and many more.

Details can be found at http://www.arkansasheritage.com/Learn/upcoming-teacher-workshops.

For more information, email Allison Reavis at allison.reavis@arkansasheritage.org, or call at 501-324-9346.


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12May/15

ARKANSAS CIVIL WAR SESQUICENTENNIAL COMMISSION APPROVES LAFAYETTE COUNTY MARKER

Arkansas In The Civil WarLITTLE ROCK—The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission has approved an application for an Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Historical Marker in Lafayette, ACWSC Chairman Tom Dupree announced today.

The marker, which is sponsored by the Lewisville Lions Club, will commemorate Civil War activities in Lafayette County and the African American legislators who represented Lafayette County during Reconstruction. The marker will be placed at a roadside picnic area on Highway 29 north of Lewisville.

Through the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Historical Marker Program, the ACWSC works with local partners to help tell the stories of how the Civil War affected communities around the state. The Commission hopes that there will be at least one marker in each of the state’s 75 counties by the end of the commemoration in 2015. Counties that currently do not have Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Historical Markers are Bradley, Calhoun, Hot Spring, Howard, Lawrence, Montgomery, Polk and Sharp.

To date, 122 markers in 67 counties have been approved. Marker applications are available at http://www.arkansascivilwar150.com/historical-markers/markers.aspx.

For more information on sesquicentennial plans, visit www.arkansascivilwar150.com or e-mail acwsc@arkansasheritage.org.

The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission is housed within the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.


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24Apr/15

FORT LINCOLN FREEDOM FEST 2015: Adding new attractions while building on tradition

Arkansas In The Civil WarLITTLE ROCK, AR (March 29, 2015) – The Arnold Family Foundation has announced that the 5th Annual Fort Lincoln Freedom Fest will be held this year on Saturday, May 2nd at the DeValls Bluff Community Center & Museum in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas.
The festival began in 2011 in honor of the historic significance and pivotal role that DeValls Bluff, along with the surrounding area, played during The Civil War. It attracts people from all over the state, as well as out of state, each year with its historic representations, exhibits and its family-friendly atmosphere.

The 5th Annual Fort Lincoln Freedom Fest is expected to grow significantly in size and in attendance this year. Event organizers are rolling out even more things for festival-goers to do. Included are: two musical stages featuring 6 musical acts [Preservation Theory headline], a Car and Motorcycle Show ending with the People’s Choice Award for the best car and motorcycle to be held at First Baptist Church parking lot, a Bass tournament on the banks of White River to start at sunrise on May 2nd, the annual 5K run/family 2K walk, start time 8:00 a.m., shuttle rides all day to the actual Fort Lincoln, arts and crafts vendors, food vendors, a rock climbing wall, the UAMS Mammo Van, Arkansas Women’s Resource and the Arkansas Arts Center Artmobile and many other things for the entire family. This year’s festival will also extend its hours from 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m., and the festival is FREE to enter.

Other Fort Lincoln Freedom Fest planned events beginning April 2015 include: The Miss Fort Lincoln Beauty Pageant will take place on Saturday, April 11th at the DeValls Bluff Community Center. You can find more information at facebook.com/Miss Ft. Lincoln, or call Hannah Jones at (501) 951-4027.
The 2nd Annual Southern Heritage Wild Game Dinner will be held at the former DeValls Bluff School Gym on Saturday, April 18th 5:30 PM. Tickets (only $10) are going fast for this wild game supper, which will feature deer, duck, and wild turkey. Special guest speaker Steve “Wildman” Wilson with Arkansas Game and Fish.

The 3rd Annual School Days will feature The Life and Exploits Deputy United States Marshall Bass Reeves (The Lone Black Ranger) to take place at the old DeValls Bluff School Grounds is April 30-May 1 from 9-2. All schools are invited. 15 “living history stations” will present living lessons in history. Space is limited so please RSVP.

The DeValls Bluff Community Center & Museum is located at 710 East Sycamore Street, in DeValls Bluff, Arkansas just 50 miles east of Little Rock on Highway 70. For more information regarding these events, please go to Facebook.com/FortLincolnFreedomFest, or contact the museum at (870) 998-2012 or Billy White, Festival Dir., at (501) 516-6064.


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21Apr/15

Arkansas in the Civil War: Refugee Colonies Running Short on Food

Arkansas In The Civil WarOne hundred and fifty years ago, the commanding officer in Pine Bluff was very concerned about the fate of refugees in the area. Forced from their homes due to one reason or another, civilians bore the brunt of the suffering and dismay, especially toward the end of the war. With two armies having ravished the countryside of practically all food supplies, civilians were at the mercy of untold intangibles.

In response to his inquiring if anything could be done for the refugees, Powell Clayton received a response from Major-General J.J. Reynolds noting, “Their destitute condition demands that they be subsisted until they are able to raise crops… The officer detailed is authorized to have and use public means of transportation for their benefit; is also charged with procuring seeds, plowing their grounds, constructing cabins, &c.” Reynolds continued, “It is suggested that an abandoned plantation in the vicinity of your post should be appropriated for their use, and all who are unable to provide for themselves be required to remove to it. This removes them from contact with the troops, and is for this reason a precaution against demoralization.”

Pine Bluff was just one among several sites refugees sought protection from roaming bands of bushwhackers and from starvation. For more information on refugee colonies and other Arkansas Civil War topics, go to www.arkansastoothpick.com.

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18Apr/15

Arkansas History Commission News

Arkansas In The Civil WarThe AHC Commemorates Its 110th Anniversary

On April 27 the State Archives will celebrate its 110th anniversary with, among other events, an open house from 10 a.m. until noon. Displays in our exhibit space and in the research room will feature historical “gems” from our collections, and the unveiling of an Arkansas photographic mural, and birthday cake will round out the occasion. Join us!

The AHC Highlights the Importance of the Gulley Collection

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, or so goes the saying. In some cases, this is literally true. In the early part of the twentieth century, the state’s government offices were moving to the new capitol building from their former homes in what would be later called the Old State House. While packing material to move, workers earmarked old records for shipment to Saint Louis for recycling.

Clara Bertha Eno

The AHC has had a number of prominent commissioners over the years. One of the first commissioners, and one to whom we owe a debt of gratitude, is Clara Bertha Eno.

Eno was born in Van Buren in 1854. One of her earliest memories was of helping her mother care for wounded Confederate soldiers during the Battle of Van Buren in the Civil War.

Black History Commission News

For years historians worried that the history of Arkansas’ African American community would be lost unless there was a concerted focus to collect and preserve historic material. In 1991, State Senator Jerry Jewell sponsored Senate Bill 710 establishing the Arkansas Black History Advisory Committee charged with the responsibility of preserving African American history.


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15Apr/15

History Commission News: Scanning Clinic

Arkansas In The Civil WarThis Friday will be our 3rd scanning clinic for the month of April:
In commemoration of the 110th anniversary of the Arkansas History Commission and State Archives, the agency will host digitization clinics each Friday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in its conference room.
For the April digitization clinics, AHC staff invites the general public to bring in material appropriate for scanning on flatbed scanners or for photographing, such as documents, maps or photographs. AHC archivists will scan and save to CDs copies of scanned material for the public. Members of the general public who choose to take advantage of this free scanning service will be asked to share the digital copies with the History Commission for research, exhibits and publication.
“The digitization clinic is a modern twist on the way the History Commission built its collections from the beginning,” said Commission Director Dr. Lisa Speer. “Through the years, our collections have grown thanks to the foresight of historically minded citizens across Arkansas and the U.S. We still like receiving donations of historical manuscripts and records, but we recognize that not everyone is ready to donate their family papers and memorabilia. This digitization clinic provides them with an option to share the content, while maintaining the originals during their lifetime.”
The Arkansas History Commission was created during the 1905 session of the Arkansas General Assembly for the purpose of collecting and preserving Arkansas’s significant wealth of historic material.
For additional information on the Arkansas History Commission and these clinics, please phone 501-682-6900 or email state.archives@arkansas.gov


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15Apr/15

ARKANSAS CIVIL WAR SESQUICENTENNIAL COMMISSION APPROVES THREE HISTORICAL MARKERS

Arkansas In The Civil WarLITTLE ROCK—The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission has approved applications for Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Historical Markers in Crawford, Dallas and Saline counties, ACWSC Chairman Tom Dupree announced today.

The approved markers are:

* Van Buren Raid, commemorating the December 1862 attack on Van Buren that culminated the Prairie Grove Campaign. Sponsored by the Drennen-Scott Historic Site of the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith, the marker will be placed at the Drennen-Scott House in Van Buren

* Dallas County in the Civil War, commemorating military activities along the Warren/Princeton Road. Sponsored by the Dallas County Museum, the marker will be placed in a park on West Third Street in Fordyce.

* Col. William Crawford and Gen. George Holt, commemorating a pair of prominent Confederate officers from Saline County. Sponsored by David O. Dodd Camp 619, Sons of Confederate Veterans, the marker will be placed at Lee Cemetery in Benton.

Through the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Historical Marker Program, the ACWSC works with local partners to help tell the stories of how the Civil War affected communities around the state. The Commission hopes that there will be at least one marker in each of the state’s 75 counties by the end of the commemoration in 2015. Counties that currently do not have Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Historical Markers are Bradley, Calhoun, Franklin, Hot Spring, Howard, Lafayette, Lawrence, Montgomery, Newton, Polk and Sharp.

To date, 120 markers in 64 counties have been approved. Marker applications are available at http://www.arkansascivilwar150.com/historical-markers/markers.aspx.

For more information on sesquicentennial plans, visit www.arkansascivilwar150.com or e-mail acwsc@arkansasheritage.org.

The Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission is housed within the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. The AHPP is the Department of Arkansas Heritage agency responsible for identifying, evaluating, registering and preserving the state’s cultural resources. Other agencies are the Arkansas Arts Council, the Delta Cultural Center in Helena, the Old State House Museum, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center, the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission and the Historic Arkansas Museum.


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14Apr/15

Arkansas in the Civil War: Lee Surrenders But War not Over in Arkansas

Arkansas In The Civil WarOne hundred and fifty years ago, General Robert E. Lee surrendered his forces at Appomattox, Virginia to General U.S. Grant. Following the historical surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, a series of military maneuvers in Arkansas became the focus of the Confederate army left in Arkansas. Though Lee surrendered his army, those Reb forces in this state were in constant motion.
According to a dispatch to Major-General Halleck in Washington, D.C., Major-General Pope wrote, “General Reynolds’ cavalry is nearly all dismounted, General Canby having taken all the horses from Arkansas.” The dispatch continued, “Whilst Reynolds might defend the posts he occupies, he has no force sufficient to oppose Kirby Smith’s advance, nor is there any force elsewhere in this command for the purpose.”
Regarding Lee’s surrender, Pope wrote, “It is not known what effect Lee’s surrender may have on this movement, but your immediate attention is invited to this dispatch: The Montgomery papers say a gentleman just from Richmond, and a Member of Congress, informs us that General Lee has ordered Kirby Smith to move with his whole army into Missouri.” Union spies concluded, “…that Kirby Smith is preparing to make the movement at the earliest possible moment.
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For more information on Arkansas in the Civil War, go to www.arkansastoothpick.com.


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